Rotating Header Image

alzheimers

Memories in the Making – Art Therapy & Alzheimers

Overview of Art Therapy Program developed by artist Maureen Simpson for Memory Care Residents of Encore Senior Village in Scottsdale, AZ. We created this video back in 2007 while working with the administrators of Encore to focus local attention on this groundbreaking program. It is very moving to see the profound effect this program had on the residents.

(Please note: Because HD video was not available at the time this video was filmed, it may appear slightly blurry when played in standard definition on your current monitor.)

Repost: Dementia Caregiving and Hospice, After55 Radio Episode 18

I recently had lunch with a friend whose parent is living with Alzheimer’s Disease. We spoke at length about the difficulties she was facing in caring for her loved one. After our meeting, I was reminded of the wonderful and informative segment I did back in the days of my radio show Live Long, Live Well with a prominent Alzheimer’s expert. I decided to repost the episode for the benefit of others who may also be facing a similar situation.

This episode featured Jan Dougherty, Family and Community Services Director at Arizona’s Banner Alzheimer’s Institute. Jan is responsible for setting new standards of care for patients with dementia and their families through the development of innovative programs.  She has developed many pioneering programs being used in Arizona and nationally.

Jan was named “Gerontologist of the Year” in 2003 by the AZ Geriatrics Society and received the “Caring Spirit Award” in 2005 from the Area Agency on Aging, Region One. She was awarded the Vision Award in 2006 from Hospice of the Valley, the Nation’s largest non-profit hospice organization. We were honored to have an opportunity to speak with her about some of the programs she has pioneered.

Press PLAY button to listen to this podcast:

 

New Compound May Help Doctors Spot Alzheimer’s Disease

From today’s Christian Post

A new imaging compound may help doctors in the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease carries symptoms similar to other conditions, which results in missed or inaccurate diagnosis of the disease. Early, accurate detection can help patients and their families plan for the effect this progressive, degenerative, brain disease will have on their loved ones. (more…)

JAMA Article Claims Merck Wrote Drug Studies for Doctors

Here’s another very sad but apparently very true tidbit about how far pharmaceutical companies will go to market their products. An article that is about to be published in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) claims that research studies published by Merck citing authorship by various medical experts, including a paper claiming that the popular pain killer Vioxx may also be a deterrent to the progression of Alzheimer’s may have actually been written by Merck itself. Upon investigation, the article claims that there appears to be scant evidence that the supposed authors of the study made any significant contribution to the study. There are also questions as to whether the clinical trials cited in this and other reports actually took place at all.

April 17, 2008 (NY TImes) – The drug maker Merck drafted dozens of research studies for a best-selling drug, then lined up prestigious doctors to put their names on the reports before publication, according to an article to be published Wednesday in a leading medical journal. (more…)

Consuming high levels of Vitamin E may extend lifespan of Alzheimer’s patients – but is it safe?

TUESDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) — Alzheimer’s patients who consume very high levels of vitamin E seem to live longer than those who do not, new research suggests. (more…)

After 55 Living Radio Episode 18 – Hospice Programs for Dementia Patients

This episode features Jan Dougherty, Family and Community Services Director at Arizona’s Banner Alzheimer’s Institute. Jan is responsible for setting new standards of care for patients with dementia and their families through the development of innovative programs.  She has developed many pioneering programs being used in Arizona and nationally.

Jan was named “Gerontologist of the Year” in 2003 by the AZ Geriatrics Society and received the “Caring Spirit Award” in 2005 from the Area Agency on Aging, Region One. She was awarded the Vision Award in 2006 from Hospice of the Valley, the Nation’s largest non-profit hospice organization. We were honored to have an opportunity to speak with her about some of the programs she has pioneered.

Press PLAY button to listen to this podcast:

 

Early Testing For Alzheimer’s – Why?

alzheimers031208bybasykes.jpg

(photo courtesy of basykes and flickr)

Smart Genetics, a company located in Philadelphia, is ready to begin testing saliva samples for Alzheimer’s. The test, called the Alzheimer’s Mirror test will cost the consumer $399. The test is due to be released on the market in the spring of 2008. I had to sit and really digest the impact of this test. USA Today wrote an article about the new test which is where I first learned about it. Click Here to read the article. I am not one to stick my head in the sand and not want to know but (more…)

Finding The Positive Side Of Memory Loss

  

The video you are about to watch helps take a look at dementia in a more positive way than is normally presented. I was at a conference this weekend that tried to teach the audience not to be emotionally overcome by those around us who have memory impairments. The bottom line is, those not suffering from a memory disorder are often the ones who suffer the most as they watch their loved ones. This video presents a refreshing outlook while at the same time teaching us how to work with those who do have memory impairments. Being in the senior business makes me want to learn as much as I can about all the many age related diseases. The more I know, the better I can relate to those different from myself. What we don’t know is usually what we fear so watch, learn and here’s to hoping we all become better educated on a disease that is affecting more and more older adults.

Alzheimer’s – A possible breakthrough?

brain1pa_468x702.jpg

(Surgeons insert electrodes into the brain during operations under local anesthetic) 

Scientists discover a way to reverse memory loss in “accidental breakthrough” – by JENNY HOPE in www.dailymail.co.uk 

Scientists have stumbled on a world first in helping a man improve his memory. They were experimenting with deep-brain stimulation in an attempt to curb the appetite of a 30st patient who suffered from a lifelong obesity problem. Electrodes were pushed into his brain and stimulated with an electric current. The treatment did not cure his eating problem – but he experienced vivid memories of an event that occurred 30 years earlier.

In the following weeks, and up to a year later, the memory of the 50-year-old patient improved. Neurosurgeon Professor Andres Lozano, who already uses deepbrain stimulation to control the tremors of Parkinson’s disease, said the treatment could help scientists understand how the memory works. A trial is under way in Alzheimer’s sufferers in the hope that a ‘pacemaker’ could be developed for the brain to improve memory loss. (more…)

After 55 Living Radio – Raising Children, Caring for Parents from NPR’s “New and Notes”

They are called the Sandwich Generation, 40- and 50-something women who are struggling to divide their time between raising kids and caring for their aging parents. Estimates on the number of women bearing this double burden run as high as 42 million. With families spread out over wider and wider geographic areas, the stress of caring for both children and parents can be overwhelming for working mothers, especially when the caregiving is being managed at a distance.

Hear the story of one SanGen mom, Dina Lipton, who is raising twin girls and fighting to save her career at the same time she is managing care for her dad, who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Even though she has brothers, the majority of the responsibilities such as managing her dad’s financial affairs, fighting for conservatorship and overseeing his medical care has fallen on her shoulders.

This is not unusual, according to Betsy Clark, the executive director of the National Association of Social Workers, who says that the image of woman as caregiver is a traditional one. Although this can vary across different ethnic and cultural groups, women will be the primary caregiver the majority of this time.

Host – Tony Cox of NPR’s “News and Notes”

Guests – Dina Lipton and Dr Betsy Clark, National Association of Social Workers

To listen now, click the DOWNLOAD button below: